Separation Anxiety

I’ve been working with most of my students for two years. They are in 8th grade and headed on to high school and we are, as it is the last two weeks of school, in the throes of separation anxiety.  Here is how it manifests itself in my students.

  • One student, who has done no and I mean no homework for any class all year, actually for two years, asks inane questions or makes comments that have already been answered or stated. The other day an assembly was scheduled during her class so obviously there is no reading or homework assigned.  She asks me what the other class read that day in the last five minutes of school.

“Why do you want to know that?” I ask.  Keep in mind it’s 90 degrees out and about 100 degrees in my fourth floor classroom.  I just want to send the kids on their way, go pick up my son, and eat popsicles and watch Thomas the Train Engine.

“So I can make up the reading, I just want to know what they read.”

“You have done no out of class work for two years. Are you really telling me you’re going to start now????

  • I checked out multiple copies of books from our media center for a reading group novel. I tell the kids if they lose it they will have to replace it and will get a detention.  One kid (who is pretty weird anyway) promptly loses it within an hour and tries to make my TA look for it. He comes up to me after school and tries to talk about it.  I eventually find the book along with his journal, which has all his work, in the recycling bin in his math class. I believe he put it there to test the detention rule and to get attention. This is also the kid who bites all the erasers of my pencils and breaks them in half and hides them in my books.
  • The most common line…

“Wait…I’m gonna be in a bigger English class next year???”
“Yes. We talked about it at your IEP meeting.”

“Oh.”

This is after two years of bitching about being in a small, special education, English class.

 

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